Bernedoodle

Description

The Bernedoodle, also known as a Bernese Mountain Poo, is a cross between the Bernese Mountain Dog and Poodle. The Bernedoodle is a 50/50 mix of a purebred Bernese Mountain Doodle and a purebred Poodle. This combination is called the F1 Bernedoodle, or a first generation cross, and it is believed that these puppies grow up to be much healthier than both of its parent breeds and that they display the most desirable mix of traits. It is possible to have a Bernedoodle with more or less than 50 percent of each parent breed in its heritage if a first-generation Bernedoodle is mated with either a Poodle or a Bernese Mountain Dog.

The Berenedoodle is a strong, robust dog with a compact and powerful body. It has a bushy tail, long-hanging ears, a triangular muzzle and button eyes. Their coat comes in a variety of colors such as black, white, tan, brindle or a combination thereof. Even though these hybrid dogs have been around less than two decades, the breed is already insanely popular.

If you are looking for a smart and loyal dog that will be your companion for life, look no further than the Bernedoodle. These hybrid fluffy pooches combine the best of both worlds: the intelligence and low shedding coat of the Poodle, with the laid-back yet incredibly loyal nature of the Bernese.

When they are still young, some Bernedoodles can be a little bit headstrong or overly energetic — this is particularly true of the toy and mini versions. For this reason, it is important that you start your Bernedoodle puppy with socialization and training early.

Bernedoodle puppies look like little bundles of curly fur and they are just full of love and affection. Because these dogs are intelligent, it is crucial to start training puppies from a young age – early socialization is also very important. During the puppy stage especially, Bernedoodles can be a little headstrong, but this tends to lessen as the dog matures and receives training. Make sure to set the right path for your pooch while they’re young and eager to learn, it will make both of your lives so much easier in the long run.

If bred well, a Bernese Mountain Poo should be an easily trainable dog, as it inherits intelligence, eagerness to please and a calm demeanor from its parents. However, expecting that every single dog of this hybrid breed turns out to have an ideal temperament is not something that’s realistic: Bernedoodle puppies are not much different than most other furry babies. This means you need to be prepared for a bit of mischief and more than a few ups and downs before you can consider them fully trained.

In some cases, these adorable fluffy puppies can be a bit more stubborn than your average dog, and it’s exactly during the puppyhood when this trait is the most pronounced — it usually goes away once your dog grows up and goes through all of the stages of training. This headstrong quality comes from the Bernese Mountain Dog line so crosses with less of this breed may not have this problem.

Nevertheless, even if takes a bit more effort, basic training and socialization are a must. Without it, your puppy could grow up to have behavioral issues. Start with the essentials, such as potty training and teaching your Bernedoodle puppy how to walk on a leash. Introduce them to children and other pets, as it will give you the opportunity to steer them in the direction of desirable behavior in such situations. Lastly, if your puppy shows promise and seems to favor the Poodle mom or dad more, you can consider moving up to more “complex” stuff. Teaching fun tricks or training for agility could be the energy outlet your pet needs and serve to deepen the bond between you.

Weight

Because the Poodle comes in three different sizes, so does the Bernedoodle. A toy or a tiny Bernedoodle stands 12 to 17 inches tall and weighs 10 to 24 lbs. A mini Bernedoodle stands 18 to 22 inches tall and weighs 25 to 49 lbs. A standard Bernedoodle stands 23 to 29 inches tall and weighs 70 to 90 lbs.

Temperament/Behavior

The Bernedoodle is a responsive and loving breed. They are intelligent, social and good with children. These traits make the Bernedoodle easier to train and a good family dog. Bernedoodles have a relaxed temperament but a moderate energy level. They will need regular exercise and playtime.

Because the Bernedoodle is a combination of two different breeds, the puppies will have a combination of personality traits from each parent breed depending on the amount of each breed involved in the cross. It can even depend on the individual pooch — littermates that have the same parents might turn out to favor different lineages, some leaning more towards their Poodle or Bernese roots than others. For the most part; however, Bernedoodles are known as well-rounded, playful, and affectionate – they do well with children and love to spend time with their families.

From the Bernese Mountain Dog side, Bernedoodles can be a little wary around strangers so early socialization is important. Toy and mini Bernedoodles also tend to be more energetic and stubborn than standard Bernedoodles. One thing to be wary of with this breed is that they need a lot of human interaction – they shouldn’t be left alone for long periods of time. This also means that separation anxiety could end up being a problem for Bernedoodles, in case they are not properly socialized on time. Because of this, it might be smart to start crate training them while they’re young. Teaching them that a crate could be their little safe space while you’re away at work could help them feel calmer and more relaxed while you’re at work.

On the other hand, the Bernedoodle’s desire to be around their owners is part of their appeal. This indicates that these cute fluffy pooches are as friendly and affectionate as they come! They inherit fierce loyalty from Bernese Mountain Dogs, who are known to form incredible bonds with their families. Your new puppy will likely be the same: they’ll get attached to you in no time and act like your typical “velcro dog.”

Common Health Problems

For the most part, the Bernedoodle is a healthy breed. In fact, the creators behind this designer breed claim that elimination of health issues typical for the purebred dogs is what drove them to crossbreed dogs in the first place. Bernedoodle breeders also claim that F1 puppies, which are 50 percent Poodle and 50 Percent Bernese, are least likely to display serious hereditary health issues. The same should hold true for the Australian Bernedoodle, as its gene pool is even more diverse than the standard Bernese Mountain Poo’s.

Reputable Bernedoodle breeders will do genetic testing on both the parents and their litters, to ensure their puppies don’t have a predisposition to certain hereditary diseases. However, in no scenario is it possible for someone to predict how healthy any dog will be throughout their lifetime: the best you can hope for is that a proper diet, plenty of exercise and regular visits to the vet will help keep your pooch healthy and happy.

Life Expectancy

The Bernedoodle is still considered a new breed still being perfected so there is not enough information about their lifespan. While there is no way to say with certainty how long Bernedoodles live, breeders estimate that the average life expectancy of a Bernedoodle is between 12 and 15 years. Of course, there are bound to be slight variations due to the difference in sizes, so a tiny Bernedoodle might live to be 17 years old, while the standard sized are closer to the shorter end of the range.

Exercise Requirements

The activity level of Bernedoodles varies depending on breeding, but they are typically a moderately active breed. They do love their outdoor adventures and will be more than happy to join you on a hike or your morning jog, but they do not need intensive exercise to stay healthy and happy. With that being said, the Bernedoodle does make a good choice for apartment dwellers, provided they have enough space and are willing to take their pet on long walks and to the dog park.

Keep in mind that these are not working dogs, and they’re specifically bred to be easygoing companions. This means that Bernedoodles adapt to various lifestyles, including different activity levels. You could be letting them roam about in a securely fenced backyard and maybe play with another canine companion, arrange a visit to the dog park for a game of fetch or simply have a daily walk around the block. If you provide them with a way to spend any extra energy and stay fit, you’re good to go.

Another important consideration when it comes to the Bernedoodle’s exercise needs is their size. The smaller varieties – toy and mini Bernedoodles – tend to be more active than the larger varieties. In any case, a good daily walk should be enough to satisfy the exercise requirements of a Bernedoodle. Their spunky personalities don’t require any excessive outdoor exercise as they’ll find plenty of ways to stay active indoors. A good idea is to offer puzzle toys and interactive toys, too. These will keep your pet entertained and offer a challenge for their smart minds.

Recognized Clubs

The Bernedoodle is not recognized by the AKC because it is technically a hybrid of two pure breeds rather than a new breed. This breed is recognized by:

  • American Canine Hybrid Club
  • Designer Dogs Kennel Club
  • The International Designer Canine Registr
  • Designer Breed Registry

Coat

Bernedoodles come in any combination of white, black, and brown. Many Bernedoodles are all-black or some combination of black-and-white (these are sometimes called “Oreo Bernedoodles”) or black-and-brown. It is also possible for Bernedoodles to be tricolor or sable – black, white and brown. This color combination is also the most difficult to achieve, and as such, the most desirable. Recently, some breeders have presented a merle Bernedoodle which displays a marbled white and gray pattern on a black coat. Puppies with this very rare coat type are usually the most expensive.

Just as Bernedoodles come in different colors according to breeding, they also have different types of coats. Most Bernedoodles have long, wavy coats that shed minimally. Curly coats are also very common and shed very little like the Poodle’s coat, and they are great for allergy sufferers. Straight-coated Bernedoodles are less common and tend to shed more than wavy or curly-coated Bernedoodles.

The goal with crossbreeding these two popular dogs was to create a perfect companion for families of all shapes and sizes. That’s why the breeders didn’t stop at first generation mixes but continued to select and perfect Bernedoodles in different sizes and with slightly different traits.

However, the Bernedoodle should be a perfect mix of the parent breeds but with hybrids, there is no guarantee. For example, in a litter of fluffy little Bernese Mountain Poos all puppies might look different from each other and each could have a different personality. One puppy Bernedoodle might take after its Poodle parent and be a furry brainiac, or he/she might favor their Swiss ancestry and turn out a bit more stubborn than you’d expect. Additionally, depending on the dog’s genetic makeup, they can have health issues more typical for one breed than the other.

Although there’s still a lot to learn about designer dog breeds, it’s safe to say that we now have a better picture about the Bernedoodle: they make wonderful pets and they are especially great with children.

Grooming

The amount of shedding depends on the type of coat your dog has inherited from either parent. Those with a straighter type are prone to shed more, whereas if its coat is curly it will tend to shed less. Brushing somewhat regularly will help to prevent matting.

Training

Since the Bernedoodle is an intelligent and interactive breed, training them should be easy. As with other breeds, it is good to train your dog while it is still young to avoid destructive and nuisance behavior later in life.

Clubs, Registries & Associations

(Based on breed recognition. See store for details on a particular puppy.)

  • Dog Registry of America, Inc.
  • International Designer Canine Registry
  • American Canine Hybrid Club
  • Designer Dogs Kennel Club
  • The International Designer Canine Registry
  • Designer Breed Registry

Additional Information

Breed: Hybrid
Average Weight: 60-100 lbs.
Personality Traits: Social, intelligent, playful
Country of Origin: Canada
Coat: Medium/Long Wavy

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